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Health Forms

clothing needed

The Health Office frequently provide clothes to children with soiled or wet clothes. Having a change of clothes on hand allows for their prompt return to class and ensures their learning!! Would you please consider clothing donations should you have clothes to spare?  

Items we could use include:

  • Shorts, cotton pants or regular fit jeans.
  • Unisex type items like sweat pants and sweat shirts
  • Sweaters (in the winter months, we get requests of warmer clothing to loan)
  • Tennis shoes or sport type sandals
  • Underclothing and socks
  • Plastic grocery bags for bagging soiled clothing

You may wish to have  your child keep a simple change of clothes in their backpack for emergencies. Thank you for your consideration!

ATTENTION: The Buckeye Unified School District does not assume any responsibility or liability for the content that may be present within external Websites linked to and from this site that are operated or created by or for organizations outside of the BUSD. The linking to or from this site does not imply on the part of the BUSD or any of its schools any guarantee of quality, assumption of liability or endorsement of the organizations maintaining external Websites. Those organizations are solely responsible for the operation of their Website and quality of the content including advertisements, links, media, images and text that they may deem appropriate

Extreme ALLERGIES

Our goal - positive practices to support students with severe allergies

Did you know there are many allergens affecting our district’s children? Each school is working to safely manage these extreme allergies. To support these students, we respectfully ask that the school is contacted if you are considering bringing food to school for sharing with students that may be considered high risk, such as foods containing nut ingredients or items such as latex balloons to avoid potential risks.

Important Note: Be sure that our staff is aware of your child’s extreme allergy and has a plan of care to address this allergy. Contact our school nurse, health clerk, teachers and office staff.

 Remember, while our school is not “nut free” we are an “allergy aware” school!!

Nurse Notes

Meds @ school & winter illness

Tis’ the season AND we are already starting to see early onset of cold, flu and other viral illnesses!!! Does your child need an over-the-counter (OTC) medication such as ibuprofen or prescription medication like an inhaler or cough medicine during the winter months? If so, be sure to pick up a medication form at the office or online here: http://buckeye-ca.schoolloop.com/file/1284215430053/1289141416614/7193013216272205828.pdf

California Ed Code requires students to have a physician’s order and parental permission to have medications at school. This includes OTC medications (even cough drops, eye drops, medicated skin cream) and items such as inhalers that they may be permitted to carry. Be sure to have your pediatrician indicate whether or not your child can carry an inhaler, epinephrine pen or diabetic related medications.

And…just a reminder, should your child take ill – DO NOT treat them with Aspirin unless otherwise specified by your pediatrician. Aspirin has been linked to a liver and brain damaging disease known as Reye’s Syndrome. This disorder is known to follow viral infection and has been linked to Aspirin use. Symptoms of Reye’s include: Nausea, delirium, lethargy, vomiting, seizure, irritability, confusion, weakness, extreme drowsiness or loss of consciousness. If your child has a combination of these symptoms after being affected by a viral illness, seek medical attention immediately! Be aware Aspirin (Salicylates) can sometimes be found in medications such as Alka-Seltzer, Dristan, Excedrin, Kaopectate, Pamprin, Pepto-Bismol or Sine-Off.

For more information about Reye’s Syndrome:

http://www.reyessyndrome.org/index.html

Here is an online list of medications containing Aspirin:

http://www.reyessyndrome.org/pdfs/nonrxprintable.pdf

Prevent the spread of illness, encourage hand washing with warm water and soap before and after all meals, after using the restroom and after playing outside or social activities.

PERTUSSIS - "Cover Your Cough"

PERTUSSIS: Pertussis is often better known by the name “Whooping Cough” or the “100 day cough” in other parts of the world. It is a bacterial disease spread by coughing that can last for months and it is contagious for a period of up to three weeks. The California Department of Public Health declared Pertussis to also be epidemic in 2014. As Pertussis is widespread it is important that both children and adults are vaccinated and that booster doses are given periodically for both alike as protection against Pertussis gradually wears off. Pertussis has even been found in the population that has had boosters as well.

What to watch for: Pertussis starts with cold-like symptoms, a mild cold that is prolonged for 5-7 days and then a persistent cough lasting weeks that typically becomes more aggressive. Coughing may produce a “whoop” noise or resulting in vomiting, choking or difficulty breathing. For any cough lasting longer than a week, follow-up with your physician or pediatrician.

VACCINATION INFORMATION: Pertussis vaccination recommendations of the federal Advisory Committee on Immunization Practice (ACIP) can be found online at the following webpage: http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/hcp/acip-recs/index.html.

Children (ages 4-6) are required to have FIVE doses of DtaP (a vaccine against Pertussis) by the time they enter kindergarten (including junior kindergarten). Vaccination ideally starts in infancy at 6-8 weeks of life.Infants should be vaccinated as this disease can be fatal to infants.Students in 7th grade in California need to have met the requirement for a Tdap (PDF) booster - see http://shotsforschool.org.

Adults are also recommended to receive a Tdap booster, especially if they are in contact with infants or are health care workers, but most adults have not yet received Tdap. Pregnant Women are recommended to receive Tdap (whooping cough booster) during the third trimester of pregnancy as it may pass some protection to the baby.

For the latest information on whooping cough in the state of California including the rates of vaccination at your school site, visit our source site listed below.

What else can you do?
Talk with your children about COVERING YOUR COUGH

Encourage them to cover their nose and mouth when they sneeze or cough either into their arm or ideally with a tissue that can be thrown away. ALWAYS wash hands after coughing or sneezing or use a hand sanitizer.

For more information on Pertussis:
http://www.cdph.ca.gov/HealthInfo/discond/Pages/Pertussis.aspx

Healthy Habits– Head Lice

Over the winter months, hats and scarves come out and cases of lice are reported more frequently during this time. Sleepover and shared clothing like coats, hats and scarves can contribute to this. Head to head contact is the most common way to pass lice from one another, but shared belongingpicture of lices pass them too.

What to do:

  • Encourage your child to store their hat, coat or scarf in their backpack.
  • Remind your child not to share clothing, brushes, hair ribbons or other items.
  • Check your child’s head, especially if they are itching or ask if the health clerk or district nurse can help you check your child.

Lesser-known facts:

  • The most common cause of repeat cases of lice is untreated viable nits.
  • Viable nits left in the hair can lay dormant and hatch when they are warm enough.
  • Lice do not jump or fly and have claws to move through hair-like surfaces by climbing.
  • A human temperature is required to hatch nits, and they only digest human blood, so they do not live on household pets.
  • Alternative treatments do not typically have any research studies showing efficacy and some may be hazardous to your child’s health – research methods listed by the CDC or California Department of Health to best treat your child.

What has the district done to help? We have adopted a notification to parents if more than one case of lice are reported in the classroom but we will need your help. Please report any cases of live lice to our health office staff so that we can track cases in the classroom. Classrooms may be checked if more than one case of live lice are found. Our health clerks coordinate these efforts and will be assisted by the district nurse. Children excluded for live lice must be treated to return to school and they will be screened during the day they return. Children with viable nits will be rescreened at the health office until nit free to ensure that they remain free of live lice. Janitorial services are notified of classroom cases so they may perform vacuuming and treatment of these classrooms.

Buckeye Union School District adopted the recommendations from the California Department of Health Services (DHS) for a “no live lice policy”. If your child has live lice, our policy states that all students must be treated prior to attending school. Recommendations include:

  • Use products containing permethrin (i.e. Nix®* or RID), this is a natural oil derived from chrysanthemums. These medications DO NOT kill nits!!! Removal of viable nits is a must as lice will return without the removal of the viable nits but children may attend school with nits.
  • Your physician can prescribe NATROBA (spinosad). An organically based soil bacterium that is not caustic and kills both lice and nits and requires no combing or follow-up treatment.
  • Treatment at home includes vacuuming all surfaces, washing all bedding and high heat treatment (dryer for 20 minutes) for items such as soft toys that are not easily washed.

Additional information about lice can be found at the CDC website at:

http://www.cdc.gov/parasites/lice/head/gen_info/faqs.html

 

A pamphlet parents have reported as being helpful can be found here:

http://www.cdph.ca.gov/HealthInfo/discond/Documents/2012HeadLiceEng.pdf

TOO ILL FOR SCHOOL?

Children Sick at School: When we consider when to send a child home, we utilize the guidelines published by the Student Attendance Review Board (SARB) of El Dorado County. Our staff follows the “Four B’s”:

  • Burning (fever over 100 degrees)
  • Barfing (can be vomiting or diarrhea)
  • Broken (severe injury where a significant sprain, strain or possible fracture could be possible)
  • Bleeding (that cannot be easily addressed with first aid, may require suture or uncontrolled bleeding of any type)

When in doubt, contact your pediatrician* or advice nurse for advice, particularly if your child claims to be sick during school hours, but not at night or over the weekend. The following guidelines for specific symptoms follow:

Fever: Fever is a common symptom of viral infections If your child's temperature is over 100, keep them at home.

Diarrhea or Vomiting: Keep at home until illness appears to be over (24 hours after last episode without medicine).

Mild Cough, Runny Noseor Congestion: If there's no fever and the child feels fairly good, school is fine.

Bad Cough: Children with bad coughs may need evaluation for bronchitis or other concern. When the cough improves and the child is feeling better, then it's back to school. A cough can take a week or longer to resolve!

Sore Throat: A severe sore throat could be strep even without fever. Symptoms are headache, stomach pain and patches in the throat. If present, contact a doctor. If it is strep throat, they can return to school 24 hours after antibiotics start.

Earache: The recommendation is to consult or visit the pediatrician or other health provider to rule out infection.

Pink Eye (Conjunctivitis): There are three types, pink eye can be highly contagious and caused by allergies, a virus, or a bacteria. Bacterial conjunctivitis will require an antibiotic; your doctor should be able to advise which this may be and whether or not they are okay to be at school.

Rash: Children with a skin rash should see a doctor, as this could be one of several infectious diseases.

*MEDICATIONS: Don’t forget that All medications at school whether prescription or Over-The-Counter (OTC) require a physician’s order and a medication permission form can be obtained at our district webpage or at the school.

 

We thank you for your understanding and helping us keep our school and community healthy and safe!

Buckeye Union School District Nurses – Jennifer Edwards, RN, BSN, PHN & Tristan Kleinknight, RN MSN, PHN

Medications at School and Winter Illness

Tis’ the season AND we are already starting to see early onset of cold, flu and other viral illnesses!!! Does your child need an over-the-counter (OTC) medication such as Ibuprofen or prescription medication like an inhaler during the winter months? If so, be sure to pick up a medication form and have it completed by your physician. Under California Ed Code, students must have a physician’s order and parental permission to have medications while at school. This includes OTC medications and items such as inhalers that they may be permitted to carry. Be sure to have your pediatrician indicate whether or not your child can carry an inhaler, epinephrine pen or diabetic related medications.

And…just a reminder, should your child take ill – DO NOT treat them with Aspirin unless otherwise specified by your pediatrician for a specific medical concern. Aspirin has been linked to a liver and brain damaging disease known as Reye’s Syndrome. This disorder is known to follow viral infection and has been linked to Aspirin use. Symptoms of Reye’s include: Nausea, delirium, lethargy, vomiting, seizure, irritability, confusion, arm or leg weakness, extreme drowsiness or loss of consciousness. If your child has a combination of these symptoms after being affected by a viral illness, seek medical attention immediately! Be aware Aspirin (Salicylates) can be found in other medications such as Alka-Seltzer, Dristan, Excedrin, Kaopectate, Pamprin, Pepto-Bismol or Sine-Off.

For more information about Reye’s Syndrome:
http://www.reyessyndrome.org/index.html
http://www.reyessyndrome.org/aspirinlists.html

Prevent the spread of illness, encourage hand washing with warm water and soap before and after all meals, after using the restroom and after playing outside or social activities.

We hope you have a healthy and happy winter!

Tristan Kleinknight, RN & Sandy Chavez, RN

Buckeye Union School District Nurses

COLD versus FLU

This time of year, we typically see an increase of studentsPicture of boy with a thermometer in his mouth-sick that are out ill. Many have symptoms of cold or flu, which are respiratory illnesses that are commonly treated in the winter. Often, it can be hard to tell which your child may be affected by. Per the CDC, influenza tends to be much more worrisome than a cold – it is usually much more severe. The chart below can help you determine cold versus flu.

Symptoms

Cold

Flu

Fever

Rare

Typically high, over 100 and lasting from 3-4 days.

Headache

Rare

Prominent

General Aches, Pains

Slight

Usual; often severe

Fatigue, Weakness

Quite mild

Can last up to two to three weeks

Extreme Exhaustion

Never

Early and prominent

Stuffy Nose

Common

Sometimes

Sneezing

Usual

Sometimes

Sore Throat

Common

Sometimes

Chest Discomfort/Cough

Hacking cough

Common; can become severe

Complications

Congestion, earache

Bronchitis, pneumonia; can be life-threatening

Prevention

Good hygiene

Annual flu shot or FluMist.

Treatment

Temporary
relief of symptoms, i.e. OTC medications.

Antiviral medications (Tamiflu or Relenza) within 24-48 hours
of onset, encourage fluids and rest, contact a physician if symptoms are severe.

The best way to prevent the flu is to obtain a vaccine. It may not be too late for you and your family to obtain the flu vaccine – check with your primary care provider today!

ONLINE RESOURCES:
http://www.cdc.gov/flu/about/qa/coldflu.htm
http://www.webmd.com/cold-and-flu/flu-guide/is-it-cold-flu

Type 1 (Juvenile) Diabetes

Do you know the warning signs for type 1 (juvenile) diabetes in children and young adults? Knowing these signs (which may occur suddenly) could help save a life: 

  • Extreme thirstPicture of a medical bracelet
  • Frequent urination
  • Increased appetite
  • Sudden weight loss
  • Sudden vision changes
  • Drowsiness, lethargy
  • Heavy, labored breathing
  • Fruity or sweet breath odor
  • Nighttime bedwetting
  • Altered or loss of consciousness

If your child or someone else you know begins to experience these symptoms, contact your pediatrician immediately. Type 1 diabetes symptoms as it is often mistaken for common illness such as the flu during this time of year. Within our county school districts, school nurses have reported having one or more students diagnosed with type 1 diabetes every year. Misdiagnosis can have tragic consequences so learning the warning signs can save a life. Early diagnosis is critical to treatment. Please share what you've learned with others you know. 

More information about type 1 diabetes can be found online at the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF): Article in its entirety can be found at:  http://www.jdrf.org/index.cfm?page_id=103498

EV68, Handwashing and YOU


cartoon picture of a yellow virus

EV68, HANDWASHING & YOU: You may have heard about a new virus strain “Enterovirus 68” or EV68 that has been infecting the midwest and moving towards the western coast. Education in prevention to reduce the risk of spreading of disease. The most obvious means of prevention is washing of hands, but it is also advised that children “don’t touch the T” - avoid touching their eyes, nose and mouth. Talk with your children about handwashing, “don’t touch the T” and to hugging or sharing food (which can also be an allergy concern). We are including a link from the CDC with a Sesame Street Video (in 8 languages!) anyone can share with students and some reference materials for this particular virus as well.  Set aside OCTOBER 15th to observe Global Handwashing Day with your family!

 

Information for parents regarding EV68

 

1.       What is EV68? Enterovirus 68 (EV68) is not a new virus, but over the past few years it has caused outbreaks of respiratory illness in the fall. These outbreaks are similar to what we see later in the year with influenza and RSV. What's different is that these outbreaks happen earlier in the fall and with a different virus.

 2.       Who does this virus infect? In the current outbreak, most patients are children under 16 with a prior history of asthma or wheezing. Symptoms include rapid onset of cough, wheezing and difficulty breathing. EV68 rarely causes fever. Most children with suspected EV68 infection respond quickly to supportive care that includes breathing treatments, such as inhalers prescribed by a health care provider.

 3.       What should I look out for? If your child or family member develops rapid onset of cough, wheezing or difficulty breathing, please contact their healthcare provider. While most patients do not require hospitalization, children can develop symptoms rapidly, so a quick call or visit to a health care clinic might be necessary.

 4.       Is there an antibiotic I can take or a vaccine? No, EV68 is a virus so antibiotics do not treat it and there are no currently available antiviral medications that treat EV68. There is also no vaccine. However, that does not mean that your child can't be treated. Children with severe respiratory distress can receive several forms of breathing treatments that reduce their symptoms and get them on the road to recovery.

 5.       Are pregnant women at risk? Pregnant women have a greater chance of being infected if they do not have immunity (protection) from previous infection withEV68. However, most pregnant women who become infected will not get sick, or they will only have mild illness. Right now, there is no clear evidence that pregnant women with enterovirus infection will have severe complications, like miscarriage, stillbirth, or congenital defects. But, if a pregnant woman is infected shortly before delivery, she can pass the virus to her baby. These babies usually have only mild illness. In rare cases, they may have severe infection.

6.       Alcohol-based hand sanitizers have limited effectiveness against enteroviruses and are not recommended for hand hygiene by healthcare personnel providing care to EV68 patients.

 

FOR MORE INFORMATION:

-CDC Materials HANDWASHING: http://www.cdc.gov/handwashing/training-education.html

-CDC Recommended Video for younger students: 

https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLWDd9lzMZFCfnkZh2KBzrscPitL7t-QBn

The CDC is expected to issue a Health Alert this week that will provide additional information, including infection control strategies. CDC’s webpage for non-polio enteroviruses can be accessed at: http://www.cdc.gov/non-polio-enterovirus/

 

NURSE’S NOTE – Brought to you by your District Nurses, Sandra Chavez, RN & Tristan Kleinknight, RN

Medicine

MEDICATIONS: Did you know? California Ed Code requires that any prescription or over the counter medicationpicture of a syringe and bottle of medicine
requires a specialized form for your child to take a medication at school. This includes students who carry an inhaler or other emergency medications on their person while at school. Forms are available in the health office or online for you to take to your physician. We may also be able to fax or email this to your physician.   If you have any further questions, please feel free to contact the office.  For a link to the district medication form:

http://wbes-buckeye-ca.schoolloop.com/file/1283091922461/8149341892857905419.pdf

SHOTS: Did you know? For ALL future school years, all students entering, advancing or transferring into 7th grade will need proof of an adolescent whooping cough (Pertussis) booster immunization (called “Tdap”) for school in the fall? This requirement applies to all public and private schools. The new requirement was signed into law in 2010. There have been changes in waivers as well, please consult with your district nurse or the health clerk to find out more. California has continued to experience outbreaks of whooping cough as protection to pertussis from early childhood vaccines wears off. The Tdap requirement affects all students in California transitioning into 7th grade. A booster AFTER AGE 7 will qualify, so you may be able to avoid the back-to-school rush and have your child over age 7 vaccinated now. For more information about vaccines: http://www.shotsforschool.org/parent-faqs/

 

Tristan Kleinknight & Sandy Chavez

Buckeye Union School District Nurses

Controlling Influenza

picture of kids with the flu

Controlling Influenza Among Children:

A 1-2-3 Approach

Did you know that children are two to three times more likely than adults to get the flu? That’s one in three children in the U.S. affected by the virus each year.  The National Association of School Nurses (NASN) is recommending a three-step approach to flu prevention.

 

1) VACCINATION: According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the best way to prevent flu is to get a vaccine, especially during October and November when rates start to rise. Rates peak in January through March. You can obtain a flu vaccine locally: In El Dorado Hills, the first will be held September 30th, 1PM-4PM at the Fire Station 85, 1050 Wilson Blvd., EDH. In Cameron Park, the first will be held on October 23rd, 1PM-4PM at the Fire Station 89, 3200 Country Club Dr., CP.  To review when additional clinics are held, or for other clinics elsewhere in EDC, go online: http://www.edcgov.us/PublicHealth/Immunizations/Flu_Clinics.aspx

 

2) ANTIVIRAL MEDICATION: Prescription antiviral medication (like TAMIFLU, oseltamivir) is for flu treatment and sometimes prevention in both adults and children.  If a child has been around someone who has the flu, a doctor may be able to prescribe antiviral medication to prevent it BUT, this medication must be given within the first 12-48 hours of exposure to the virus.

3) GOOD HYGIENE: Practicing good hygiene: Washing hands with soap and warm water at least 20 seconds; Cover mouths and noses with tissues when sneezing or coughing, Avoid sharing drinks, silverware and pencils.
NASN Logo National Association of School Nurses

FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ON THE INFLUENZA VIRUS, VISIT WWW.CDC.GOV/FLU  

This program is sponsored by the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) and supported by an educational
grant from Roche.

 

vaccines

Did you know? For ALL future school years, all students entering, advancing or transferring into 7th grade will need proof of an adolescent whooping cough booster immunization (called “Tdap”) for school in the fall? This requirement applies to all public and private schools. The new requirement was signed into law in 2010.

picture of vaccine injector

In 2010, California experienced its worst outbreak of pertussis in more than half a century, with more than 9,000 confirmed cases and 10 infant deaths. Protection to pertussis from early childhood vaccines wears off and preteens and teens may be at risk for catching this dangerous disease without a booster. The Tdap requirement affects all incoming 7th grade students in California. A booster AFTER AGE 7 will qualify, so you may be able to avoid the back-to-school rush and have your child over age 7 vaccinated now.

Kindergarten students (or first grade students in their first year of school) are also required to have vaccines prior to school. This information is available at your health office for review.

Did you know? California Ed Code requires that any prescription or over the counter medication requires a specialized form for your child to take a medication at school (or carry an inhaler or other emergency medications on their person while at school). Forms are available in the health office or online for you to take to your physician. We may also be able to fax or email this to your physician.   If you have any further questions, please feel free to contact the office. 

Jennifer Edwards & Tristan Kleinknight, Buckeye Union School District Nurses

poison oak and rashes

poison oak pix.jpg

It’s that time of year when trees and bushes begin to bloom.  Most of these beautiful plants are harmless to humans.  There is one plant that everyone should be cautious of: Poison Oak.  Poison Oak is a small bush type plant with leaves that occur in threes.  It is green in color with a yellow to reddish hue as it ages and will often look shiny.  The bush may or may not produce berries.  If a person comes into contact with this bush, they will likely develop a rash as a reaction to the urushiol oils on the plants leaves and twigs.  Depending on the location and severity of the exposure, the rash may vary from a minor aggravation to a serious problem. 

rash pix.jpgRash Characteristics:  A very itchy, blistering rash caused by contact with the poison oak plant.  The rash will cause localized redness, swelling and weeping of the blister.  It is usually located on exposed body surfaces or areas frequently touched by the hands.  The rash is usually extremely itchy.  Onset of rash occurs in 1-2 days after exposure.  The pattern of rash is typically in lines or streaks. 

Rash Causes: Poison Oak rash is caused by exposure to the oil from a poison oak plant.  The oil can be found on the leaves, branches, stems, berries, or roots of the plant.  Oils can also be carried and transmitted by animals. 

Return to School: Poison oak is not contagious to others. There is no need to miss any school.

Treatments: Severe reactions may require the attention of the pediatrician and prescription medications. Over the counter medications may also be given such as calomine. Tecnu is a soap commonly used by those working closely with poison oak that breaks down the urushiol oil that is present on the leaves. Always consult with your pediatrician about what medications you should use for your child.

Don’t Forget! For all medications taken to school, from cough drops to prescribed treatments, a medication form MUST be completed by the parent and an order or the medication form must also be completed by the physician as per California Ed Code. Thank you for your understanding!  

have you heard about Harvest of the Month?

kitty nurse.jpgOverview – What is Harvest of the Month? Harvest of the Month is an initiative of the California Department of Public Health that features nutrition education tools and resources to support healthy lifestyle habits like eating fruits and vegetables every day.

Why Harvest of the Month? Research shows eating a colorful variety of fruits and vegetables and getting at least 60 minutes of physical activity daily can help children maintain good health, a healthy weight, and lower risk for other serious health problems. Nearly two out of five children in California are overweight or obese. Among very low-income families, more than half are overweight or obese. The extra weight can have a serious impact on children’s health, putting them at higher risk for type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and certain types of cancer. Of California children ages 9-11 years, only three of ten are eating the recommended.

For more information about Harvest of the Month and Nutrition Resources: http://www.harvestofthemonth.cdph.ca.gov/download/HOTM_Overview%20Flyer_FINAL-3-28-2013.pdf
http://www.harvestofthemonth.cdph.ca.gov/
http://www.cachampionsforchange.cdph.ca.gov/en/index.html
Espaniol: http://www.campeonesdelcambio.cdph.ca.gov/es/index.html

District Nurses: Tristan Kleinknight, RN & Sandy Chavez, RN
tkleinknight@buckeyeusd.org and schavez@buckeyeusd.org

Nutrition and our Cafeteria

picture of plate with food groups

The newest food guideline adopted by the The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) is called “MyPlate”. This guide is a good visual display to help children make healthier food choices. It’s important to know, you and your children should look at eating a “plate” size portion of food – just one. There are FIVE food groups; Vegetables, Fruits, Grains, Protein and Dairy. You should be eating foods from these groups every day. The new guidelines recommend that you to eat less and avoid oversized portions. The healthiest plate should be made of 50% fruits and vegetables (with emphasis on the veggies) and the other half of the plate made up of grains (preferably whole grains) and protein with a “side” of dairy. This could be a serving of milk, yogurt of cheese and fat-free or low-fat dairy options are encouraged. Specific guidelines as to portions may vary based on your age, gender and activity levels. For more information about these USDA guidelines – visit http://www.choosemyplate.gov/.

Did you know at Buckeye Union School District we are committed to promoting the dietary standards made by the USDA. “Our mission is good nutrition” and we support learning by promoting healthy choices at our schools. For more information about what we do in our district, visit our Nutrition Services website at: http://www.schoolnutritionandfitness.com/index.php?sid=1708071704288389

At this site you can: Apply for Free/Reduced lunches, access menus, review nutritional information of meals and access other information about nutrition fitness and making healthy choices for meals.

Brought to you by your District School Nurse –
Tristan Kleinknight, RN MSN PHN